Thurs, March 31, 9-10pm–a Mini-CR on-the-air, with National Women’s Liberation: What goes into women’s decisions to have or not have children? If we do have children, does our society support us?

Joy of Resistance is heard on Thursdays* 9-10 PM on WBAI Radio, 99.5 FM (EST), streaming at wbai.org Follow us on twitter at @joyofresistance Email us at jor@wbai.org Donate to WBAI at give2wbai.org

In February and March of 2016The New York Chapter of National Women’s Liberation held CR (Consciousness Raising) meetings, where women testified, from their own experience, on what factors have determined–or will determine–whether or not they have children. Those who have had children testified on whether/how that experience changed their views.

Some of the testifiers will be live in the studio and some on the phone, for a “mini-CR on-the-air”–as well as talk about the conclusions they reached through looking at these questions in depth.

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We’ll also look at how our society supports or does not support these parenting decisions and the “Social Wage” programs that women in many other countries have, such as (Single Payer National Healthcare, free or low-cost Childcare and Paid Parental Leave).

Lastly, we’ll discuss the Zika virus and current instructions being given to women by governments, the U.N. and healthcare workers, about whether/when to become pregnant .

Here is the complete list of questions that were brought to these meetings and will be addressed on this show:

1. What are our reasons for wanting children, if/when we wanted them. (Whether we had them, didn’t, or are still planning to.) Reasons for not wanting them?

If we had them, did our thinking about this change after we had them? If we didn’t have them, did our thinking change?

2. Additional question for those who have done parenting work: When does this work feel like an individual responsibility? When does it feel like a collective (community, society wide,national) responsibility?

Hilary Wainwright

In the latter part of the show, we will be taking listener phone calls on these topics at (718) 780-8888.

We’ll also present our worldwide feminist news headlines and topical music.

 

Thurs, March 12, 9-10 PM, Yanar Mohammed, reknowned Iraqi feminist will be guest on Joy of Resistance

WBAI is heard at 99.5 FM in the tri-state area of the U.S. and streams live here On Twitter, follow JOR at @joyofresistance To contribute to WBAI go to give2wbai.org

Reknowned Iraqi Women’s Rights activist Yanar Mohammed will be a guest on Joy of Resistance on Thursday, March 12 between 9 & 10 pm (EST). The show will also contain excerpts from one of the many forums surrounding the Beijing +20 Commission on the Status of Women, which is meeting at the UN this March.

About Yanar Mohammed: Yanar Mohammed was born in Baghdad. She is a co-founder and the director of the Organization of Women’s Freedom in Iraq, and serves as the editor of the newspaper Al-Mousawat (Equality). She is one of the most prominent women’s rights campaigners in Iraq, and received the Gruber Foundation Women’s Rights Prize in 2008. Her organization has set up shelters–now five of them–for women in Iraq fleeing honor killings, gay men and women threatened with murder, and, recently, women who are survivors of ISIS.

While not being anti-religion, she is a strong believer in secular government and claims that women’s equality ‘can only be achieved through secular government because an Islamic government would hurt women’s rights.’ She cites the 2008 Human Rights Watch Report states that women have been ‘attacked on the street for what they consider “immoral” or “un-Islamic” behavior including not wearing a headscarf’, and that ‘the threat of these attacks keeps many Iraqi women at home.’

As a result of her work on women’s rights that essentially attacks what could be called ‘hard line’ interpretations of Islam, Yanar has had to receive personal security as a result of having received death threats. Jaish al Sahaba, part of the Iraqi Islamist group the Supreme Command for Jihad and Liberation, sent two death threats to Yanar Mohammed in 2004. These were quoted as being directly related to Yanar’s efforts to achieve gender equality in Iraqi law. As a result she has now been provided with armed protection. Yanar has been strongly critical of the US invasion of Iraq, suggesting that the ‘US occupation turned the streets of Iraq into a ‘no-women zone’.

She has also talked of a false choice existing between occupation and ‘political Islam’ (religion taking on State functions, i.e., theocracy) clearly preferring a third way between these two. The ‘choice’ in Iraq is between: ‘..the American occupation that is willing to do genocide, or..political Islam, that will make us live in a completely inhuman and unliberated way of life’. Speaking in an interview in 2007, she outlined her views in the US invasion and the effect it is having on Iraq:

‘..the suggestion is that the US troops should leave immediately, because we, the people of Iraq, do not agree that all the jihadists from around the world are coming to Iraq to fight this so-called US evil, and our cities are turning into an arena of fight, and all our lives are being devastated. The US troops need to leave immediately, with no conditions. And we do not accept the debate that there will be a bloodbath afterwards, because nothing is worse than the sectarian war that we are living right now, that is also a consequence of this war’.

Yanar believes that the US occupation of Iraq is fuelling the insurgency and violence prevalent in post-2003 Iraq, which is having a detrimental effect on women’s rights.

Daniel Holtzclaw and the routine sexual assault of Black women by police

On Wednesday, Dec. 17, 9-10 PM, Joy of Resistance: Multicultural Feminist Radio @ WBAI will look at the case of the Oklahoma police officer Daniel Holtzclaw, accused of assaulting 8 Black women by using using his power as an officer of the law to threaten and coerce women into sexual compliance with his wishes. He chose victims who were vulnerable and who often had police records, threatening legal retaliation if they did not comply and knowing that their word would not be believed over his if they spoke out.  The women knew this also. Holtzclaw faces 32 criminal counts including rape, sexual battery, forcible oral sodomy and indecent exposure.

Those who work closely with poor black communities say that this case only hints at what is a vast underbelly of routine and systemic police sexaul assults on Black women. They are demanding that this issue be included in current demands for justice for Black communities, being made in the wake of the spate of recent murders of black men by police.

The Black Feminist group Black Women’s Blueprint decided to take this case and issue of police violence against Black women to the United Nations Committee Against Torture in Geneva this past November.

Our guests will be: 1) Andrea Ritchie a police misconduct attorney whose legal practice, and advocacy work focuses on the profiling and policing of girls, women, and transgender people of color. She coordinates Streetwise and Safe (SAS) and is on the steering committee of Communities United for Police Reform and 2) Netsanet Tesfay, a human rights attorney at Black Women’s Blueprint, where she provides legal assistance and is also working on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which focuses on black women in the U.S. and their experiences with rape and sexual assault. She recently was part of a delgation to the U. N. Committee Against Torture, in Geneva Switzerland, where she and other members of BWB presented a report entitled: INVISIBLE BETRAYAL: POLICE VIOLENCE AND THE RAPES OF BLACK WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES to the Committee.

We will be discussing the extent and character of police sexualized violence against Black women in the United States, its invisibility and its “routine” nature as well as why Black Women’s Blueprint found it necessary to take their “case” to the U.N. in November. We will start with the Daniel Holtzclaw case and move outward to its significance, its historical precursors and the future of justice for women victims of police violence.

We will be taking listener phone calls at (212) 209-2900 in the latter part of the show. If you have experienced sexual harassment by police, we would be particularly interested in hearing your story.

The show will also include feminist news stories and music. Host: Fran Luck